Annals online dating

But you wouldn’t know it by looking at the founders of every major dating start-up.From the Web-based heavy hitters like Ok Cupid, e Harmony, and Plenty of Fish on down to newer apps like Skout, How About We, and Meet Moi, they’re all developed by men.

A Northwestern University study found that men viewed more than three times as many profiles as women and were about forty per cent more likely than women to send a message or chat after viewing a profile.

“The most desirable partners, especially the most desirable women, are likely to find the process of sifting through so many first-contact e-mails aversive, perhaps causing them to disengage from the process altogether,” the researchers write.

Plus the whole shopper-product dynamic made me feel gross.

Rolland says that he hears this complaint occasionally—from women, but not from men. “Even women who are looking for something more casual, I don’t think they’re wanting to waste their time.” Carbino works with Talia Goldstein and Valerie Brennan, the co-founders of Three Day Rule, an L.

(I live in Los Angeles.) Not a sign of a very robust user base.

I didn’t see a single man I’d be interested in messaging.

Blendr is the most high-profile of a series of new location-based dating apps for straight people.

It was created by the same folks who made Grindr, the hookup app that’s become ubiquitous in the gay community.

“Blendr is generally useless, and there is a huge, untapped market for a hookup app for straights (or everyone other than gay men, really),” one of them wrote to me.

“Attitudes towards sex have shifted massively in the past decade or so, not just amongst young people.”And not just among men.

“The main problem was women, especially attractive women, busy women, would stop using a dating Web site after their first experience, because it was a disaster.